Extinction of the Golden Arches


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The obesity stats in America have been well documented for quite some time and still are startling each time I look at them. How is it possible that 15% of our country’s children are considered obese? Many different issues attribute to this fact, but one of America’s biggest crutches shines the brightest: the fast food industry. Wouldn’t it be nice if we were able to get ride of these evil empires and significantly increase the health of our youth and population as a whole? The McDonald’s and Burger King’s of America sit all along the freeways waiting for travelers to come clog their arteries with cheap poorly made burgers and fries. The statistics out there about these fast food joints show that they are nothing but an impediment on society.

One measly meal at a local fast food restaurant can average out to 37% of a person’s daily calories and 42.6% of the carbohydrates. For a family that stops by their once during the day, this could be corrected by two other healthy meals, but as we all know, that is not usually the case. With some customers coming numerous times a day due to the low prices and great taste, their health diminishes severely as the days go on. As seen in this clip from the critically acclaimed film, “Super Size Me,” the man running the documentary had his health deteriorate significantly after his solely McDonald’s based diet. Quite honestly, I feel shares borderline comparisons with tobacco and alcohol in respect to how they harm the human body.

Obviously since these are large corporations with armies of lawyers that defend each and everyone of their moves, getting rid of this industry is very likely. However, it is interesting to think how the country would fair with the disappearance of the fast food. How drastically would obesity fall and the average life span go up? I realize that the economy would feel the negative effects of their extinction and the government would never back such an event due to this and the many lobbyists that pollute our capitol for the benefit of the industry, but it would be interesting to see if the American people as a whole had a better quality of life without the temptation of their shoddy food products.

McDonald’s Global Rationalization


McDonald’s Global Rationalization

golden arches

As my parents loaded my brother and me into the car our shrills of excitement grew louder and louder as we drove down the road that would inevitably lead us to the beautiful golden arches of McDonald’s. The red and yellow signage made me smile a 1,000-watt smile and the play place was like reaching nirvana. This fast-food restaurant was the realization of all my childhood dreams and wishes: tasty food, a toy with every meal, free refills of bubbly soda, and a place to take my shoes off and run and play. Those golden arches were a sign of happiness, relief and comfort when I was a child, it meant it was time to eat and play and have fun. Continue reading

The Mcdonaldization of the World


“Food is a complex case. Its consumption is universal, mundane and polyvalent. Everyone eats; most eat several times a day without much reflection; yet the activity is integrally connected with many other highly meaningful aspects of living. It is meaningful because it is social…” (Warde, 1997: 180).

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Obamacare to the Rescue: The End of American Obesity?


Before taking the Health Reform quiz, I assumed I would only get 2-3 correct out of the 10 questions because the PPACA seems like a very intricate overhaul of our healthcare system. However, I know the basics of the act and the questions in the quiz were pretty straightforward–I got 9 out of 10 correct by asking myself: does this answer match up with the goal of Obamacare? Which, in my opinion, is to give people easier access to healthcare. Continue reading