The Side Effects of Obamacare


How likely are these side effects?

How likely are these side effects?

Upon taking the test, I scored an unanticipated 8 out of 10….now, in no way do I think this is representative of my knowledge of this act. I found that many of the aspects of the act were new to me, and as I learned I started to materialize my own opinions. I strived to find why the biggest piece of healthcare legislation since Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Demand Surging for Health Exchange Insurance Plans


I know that the snafus in the website have dominated the  short-attention span news cycle and played perfectly into meta-narratives of “government can’t do anything right.” In fact, a private Canadian contractor, CGI, bid and won on the bulk of the project.  The US government did not solely build the software platform.  This Washington Post blog covers a lot of detail.  But the ADD media can’t be bothered to actually try to explain the real issues. Continue reading

Obamacare to the Rescue: The End of American Obesity?


Before taking the Health Reform quiz, I assumed I would only get 2-3 correct out of the 10 questions because the PPACA seems like a very intricate overhaul of our healthcare system. However, I know the basics of the act and the questions in the quiz were pretty straightforward–I got 9 out of 10 correct by asking myself: does this answer match up with the goal of Obamacare? Which, in my opinion, is to give people easier access to healthcare. Continue reading

Tax on Medical Devices


By taking this quiz I truly realized how little I know about the PPACA. Although I did score a 4/10, to be fair I would have to call all of my answers guesses. I find it quite amazing how little I know about one of the top, if not the single most common subject mentioned in the news. Now, I do take some responsibility for this, but I do not think it lies solely with me. We have talked all semester about the best way to present information for your audience, and it is clear that the government did not do an extensive job presenting this piece of legislation. Perhaps when something so relevant comes into law the government (like the PPACA) should go to extra lengths to ensure that the public is well informed to its purpose, or supposed purpose.

Continue reading

Employer Requirements


This is another good topic for this week’s blog. I enjoy how these subject matters are very pertinent to today’s political and economic debates. The quiz was a great way to start discussions. I got a 8/10 on the quiz. I knew a fair amount on the rules behind the PPACA, but I did not expect to get an 80%. I would admit that this quiz was not the best indicator of my knowledge since I guessed on a couple of questions. One question I got wrong was “Will the health reform law require employers with 50 or more employees to pay a fine if they don’t offer health insurance?” The answer is yes. I was unaware of this provision. I did not know the PPACA required employers, who employed over a certain threshold of full time employees,  to pay a fine. Instead I was under the impression employers would only face a fine if they did not offer health insurance to employees who worked over thirty hours a week.

employer-penalty-flowchart-v3-071513

The provision, 4980H, applies to “applicable large employers” or companies that employ more than 50 full time employees.  If small companies do not meet the “applicable large employer” criteria, the penalties do not apply to them. Furthermore the small employers may be eligible for a health insurance tax credit if they employ fewer than 25 employees and the average income is up to $50,000. The provision requires large employers to offer its full time employees and dependents to enroll in minimum essential coverage under the employer-sponsored plan, or pay a $2,000 penalty annually multiplied by the number of full time employees, excluding the first 30 workers. However if the employer offers coverage but the insurance does not pay for at least 60% of covered health care expenses for a typical population or if at least one of the employee(s) has to pay 9.5% Continue reading

Forcing the Issue


After seeing the assignment for this week’s blog, I became quite excited about reading up on the Affordable Care Act as I have very little knowledge of its specifics. Unfortunately, I have not been motivated to really look into Obama’s proposal because it really does not have much of an effect on me in the immediate future. However, I do understand the historic importance of the act as it is probably of the largest and most contentious pieces of legislation that has been passed in my lifetime. Furthermore, I believe that it represents the first significant health care reform passed since Truman’s presidency (correct me if I am wrong). As indicated in the directions, I began my research by taking the quiz on the Act and, much to my surprise, got 6 out of 10 correct. I was slightly impressed by my results, but have to admit that I guess on about half of them.

In choosing exactly what aspect on the act that I wanted to focus on, I thought it would be prudent to start with arguably the most important part: the Individual Mandate. Ultimately, I wanted to start here because it appears to be the most controversial part of the reform and the part that is most important for it to work as planned. Now I will attempt to explain it as I understand it: Continue reading

America’s Waiting Rooms of Death


So apparently I know a lot more about ObamaCare than the blog council or I would have ever thought. Admittedly while I took the online quiz I did guess on a few of the questions but when it was all said and done I got a 6/10. Now that definitely isn’t something to brag about, a 60% is still failing, but I was surprised to see that I was more informed about this policy then I initially thought. Continue reading

Blog Post 7 (Affordable Care Act)


In March 2010, over three years ago today, Obama and his administration passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), also known as “Obamacare.” Even the name has been a political football with Obama at first not wanting it labeled with his name as Republicans were doing,  and then embracing it.  This has been a topic that has swirled in our newsfeeds and is frequently a topic of conversation. Yet, much of the general public does not know the details or even the major facts of the act.   In fact, the Democratic party has been proposing some form of national health insurance since at least President Truman.

However, it seems the government, politicians, and the media have not done a great job explaining this law.

TAKE THIS QUIZ... post your answer below.  Th BC would be surprised in you get 2-3 right.

For this week, we invite you to learn more about the act, which, in reality, has many, many parts.   Write about one specific provision or aspect of the PPACA law.  Use  good resources about the PPACA explore one aspect of the act that you had not previously known about.  Your goal is to explain what it does in specific terms.

This post links into doing paper 2 and the final paper in terms of information literacy.  To explain your provision, you may find government sites, news coverage, research centers, or think tanks are useful.

We invite you to learn about it it “before’ you put on your own political lenses.  Does the provision or aspect you describe seem like a good idea?

After you have done so, please think back to last week and analyze the provision FROM your apparent political ideology.

PLEASE, try NOT to repeat topics!

Continue reading

Blog Council 6 (Parks and Recreation)


In the spirit of Nick Offerman performing this weekend, this week’s blog council decided to make connections between different characters from the show Parks and Recreation and this week’s posts. Some of the connections are a little “loose,” but bear with us.

orig-14155281

Leslie Knope- Chris M. Continue reading

The American Dream is Over.


blog post picTo my surprise I was labeled a “Main Street Republican” on the political test we all took. I’ve always considered myself moderate with some conservative ideologies so to be considered so far right by the test really surprised me. Upon looking deeper into the reasons I was labeled this way and reading the Neoliberalism – Why the American Dream is Losing Steam I began to see how an online exam would think I belonged with the likes of Nixon.

Continue reading

Refusal to Stop the Time Bomb


A protester depicts the frustration of the American people towards government officials

I must preface this post by saying that I lean toward a conservative political ideology, but after digging deeper into the viewpoints of liberals regarding the government shutdown and debt crisis, I understand their point of view.  Republicans were essentially holding the nation’s economy hostage in leaving the government unopened and threatening not to raise the debt ceiling if Obamacare is not repealed.  I agree that targeting the Affordable Care Act, the legacy of President Obama’s term, was a poor move because even if Republicans could muscle their way into getting enough votes to edit the legislation through Congress, the President would veto it.

That being said, Democrats are just as much to blame as Republicans.  They refused to negotiate on any terms unless the government was first opened and the debt ceiling was raised long-term. Harry Reid essentially was telling Republicans to concede to all of the Democrats’ terms and then negotiations will begin. This caused strict partisanship and lengthened the government shutdown, as Republicans could not find any common ground with Democrats.  Continue reading

My old 2 cents…


In the poll I put up, about half of you did not want me to post.

I go back-and-forth in my own mind about how much to contribute to the blog, how much to join in discussions, and so on.  On the one hand, I think you have a right to know “where I am coming from,” especially since I think transparency is superior to trying to pretend we have “completely objective” viewpoints.   On the other, I can take many different positions on different business or political issues; moreover, I do not want you to think I am grading your political philosophy even when I agree or disagree with you. Continue reading

Both Sides of the Story


With my parents and grandparents being staunch GOP supporters, I was pushed into a conservative mindset ever since I was a young child. The test telling me that I am a Main Street Republican comes as no surprise, for FOX News seems to perpetually be on the television sets in my home. Regardless of my predetermined feelings on issues, I do enjoy hearing the other side of the argument in order to not be ignorant of good details and valid viewpoints. New York Times columnist Paul Krugman wrote a very nice piece on the government shutdown and the Republican faults in the issue. Although I feel at some points he is being very narrow minded, his opinions seem to have a solid backing.

As a historically Liberal writer, Krugman obviously points out many Republican stances that are causing this temporary shutdown. I do agree with him that it would be asinine for Republicans to refuse the raising of the debt ceiling because of their positioning against Obamacare. That can cripple our rebuilding economy and push us back into yet another Depression. I just wish that Krugman would address both sides of the issue a little more rather than just beating down on one party. In every disagreement there are two sides to a story and he is just giving his readers a very one-sided viewpoint. Articles like this are great to read if the person agrees with the stance and wants reassurance on their opinions, but for a person that wants factual information on both sides of the issue, it is not very helpful.

Gaining Different Perpectives


Like Jordi mentioned in the blog instructions, most people read or watch the news from media sources that express the same political stance that you already believe. I am guilty of this myself. I never watch the news on television, and I normally only read the Wall Street Journal. It’s only human nature to do so. It is comforting and reassuring to read articles written by people that share the same beliefs as you. Conversely, it is frustrating to read a politically article written by someone on the other side of the spectrum as you.

So regarding the government shutdown, I have read most of my news about it from articles with a conservative bias. The article “What Obama Has to Do to End the GOP Shutdown” in The Nation was the first really left-leaning article I’ve read on the topic. It was frustrating to read for two reasons. First, it is written in a way that makes it seem that Republicans are the cause of all the world’s problems and that Democrats are a model of perfection. Secondly and the main reason people do not like reading opposing view points, the article makes some very good arguments against my stance. It’s difficult to hear the flaws in your argument. It’s much easier to just have your stance validated by the news you read.

I certainly fall into the habit of only reading conservatively based news reports, and sometimes can make me narrow-minded about controversial issues between political parties. Doing this exercise was a reminder I needed to reach out more and read more articles from various news outlets to get a wider range of perspective.

Whats better than a Government Shutdown for Libertarians?


Did libertarians enjoy the reduction of the government’s influence during the shutdown?

According to Scott Shackford, no.

Last week, the columnist for the libertarian magazine, Reason.com, wrote an article titled, “The Government Shutdown and Our Permission Society: Many private harms caused by the government shutdown are due to its own insistence on meddling in our lives.” Its clear to see that many private enterprises are negatively affected by the shutdown. According to Scott Shackford, the adverse affects on private commerce during the shutdown demonstrate the dangers of too much bureaucracy.  Continue reading

A Ploy or Politics ?


I always knew I leaned to the right but being labeled a “Main Street Republican” seemed a bit far to me. But after reading an article from The Nation, it was easy to side with the Republicans. Being from New Jersey, I was drawn to the article about Chris Christie. It was written about the special senator election after the passing of the former NJ senator, Frank Lautenrberg. Cory Booker was, a Democrat was elected. John Nichols writes that Christie planned this special election in an attempt to curb the gubernatorial election at the beginning of next month. It apparently was a ploy to keep voters from going to the polls by confusing them with a date change. Changing the voting date from a Tuesday to a Wednesday is what ruined the election – except it didn’t. The Democrat won. Even though Christie rigged the election by confusing voters, the opposite party won the election, sending another Democrat to DC. Yes the turn out was low and the Democratic candidate would have safely won the election, but the article suggests that this is not a positive for the Democratic Party. It is instead an “atrocious abuse of political process,” simply because Christie changed the Election Day.

The way Christie set up the election day is was smart way to win an election. Being a Republican in a primarily Democratic state, Christie used the means he had available to help him in the up coming election for governor. It was a strategy, not a ploy. Any politician makes things work in their favor. In doing this, he still helped the democrats too. A Democratic senator was still elected. There is no need to blame him for abusing power or using manipulation when all he did was try to help himself in his upcoming election. This article was “atrociously” exaggerated and based on assumption.

Is The Government Shutdown Going Too Far?


I really enjoyed taking the quiz to see where I fall on the political spectrum. I wasn’t surprised when I got a moderate rating because I have always believed myself to be economically conservative and socially liberal. I strongly believe in same sex marriage and I am pro-choice, but as my quiz results stated, I’m strongly pro-business. I attribute my slight lean towards the right to the fact that I grew up in a strongly conservative household, but as I got older, I started to change some of my views and think for myself. I feel as though my views are still changing and will probably continue to change as a result of getting older and more informed about political happenings in the America.

Continue reading

Keep Your Friends Close, and Your Enemies Closer


Americans want a cohesive government, but all we get is childish bickering.

Americans want a cohesive government, but all we get is childish bickering.

After taking the test, I found that I am a post-modernistic thinker.

Here, is my test.

This basically means that I am generally supportive of government, but really in the hope that we will reform our view of regulation and sustainability as a tool for a prosperous future. I was very interested to see my score on the political view test, and it really does seem to be accurate. Throughout the 16 day shutdown, I felt more so that the government was being childish than anything. Although the Republican party knew that it wouldn’t succeed in not raising the debt ceiling, they pushed for a long time, costing us approximately 26 billion dollars to our economy according to Standard & Poors. I strongly opposed the shutdown, and felt that we really just needed to make a decision and go with it. After 16 days, we have gone with the decision to raise the debt ceiling for now, but who is to say that we won’t be having these same grueling arguments in February when the debt question will be up again. Continue reading

Racism to Blame for GOP’s Fight Against ObamaCare?


Although I am still finding my own voice and forming my own opinions, the quiz reaffirmed that I am a “main street Republican.” Some things that I know for sure: I am pro choice and I believe the government is too big right now–spending is out of control and our deficit is a major concern.  Continue reading

Still Making Demands?


I enjoyed taking the political quiz to begin this exercise, however I felt that the polarity of the choices undermined the real potential of asking tough questions and may not offer the most complete political profile.   Of course, the face value of a twenty-question quiz is not equal to rational, informed decision-making when choosing a political stance.  Forming insightful, rational opinions is the theme of this week’s blog, and a crucial skill for forming an individual opinion.  While it may seem trivial, many of us (myself included) often take headlines and statistics as fact, and base our reaction and response off of that information alone.  Just as a political quiz may present “obvious” options for many questions, they may not truly be the best answers.

Continue reading

Who Decides What Services are “Essential?”


The quiz was a great way to start off this political discussion. I believe many young people today are not as fixed and rigid on their political stance as earlier generations. This may be a generalization, but from my experience and talking with my peers, it seems today people may identify with one party, but are more open minded and willing to stray a bit away from their party’s ideals. This is the visible problem with government. The two parties are becoming more polarized and unwilling to wander from its ideals. Upon taking the quiz I identified as a Libertarian, which did not surprise me. I am more conservative on fiscal issues, and liberal on social issues.

I found a very thought provoking article on The Nation. The title of Kramer and Comerford’s article caught my attention: ” That Time When DC Stopped Funding Domestic Violence Shelters While Both Congressional Gyms Stayed Open.” The main argument is who can and should decide what services are “essential” during a shutdown?US+1+October+2013

Continue reading

The Disaster of the Government Shutdown?


22-930x350_000008I enjoyed taking that quiz to “decipher” my political standing. But, when taking the quiz I did find that some of questions were worded with bias (they were worded in such a way that it was much easier to choose one answer over the other). For example, statement 6:

Government is almost always wasteful and inefficient Government often does a better job than people give it credit for

The first option is way more radical of a response, where as the second option simply says that people do not give the government enough credit. I think that this question made it way too easy to be in support of the government. Yet, I did choose the response that the government is inefficient.

Continue reading

Time for Change


Before diving into this post, I would first like to highlight how beneficial of an exercise that I think that this is for all of us, especially for students in general. Nowadays, it is way too easy for people to adopt a certain set of views simply because they grow up around people who think the same way or because they read or watch news from the same media source. Personally, I believe that I am very lucky in this sense because I grew up in a household with a father that is quite conservative and a mother who is quite liberal. Neither of my parents ever pushed their views upon me and always encouraged me to learn about world events on my own. Consequently, I have developed into a person that is quite moderate. Those closest to me often describe me as a person who rarely argues vehemently for something, but always serves as a moderator for an argument, frequently chiming in when I see flaws or hear outlandish comments from either side. For me, this has been very beneficial because it has allowed me to examine various arguments with a relatively unbiased view and better understand where each side is coming from. Continue reading

Poor Writing? Or Bad Idea?


Interesting little writing example… or controversial statement

B-Ethics

This from discussion of 12 Years a Slave  in Salon.com

Fassbender, the German-born star who plays Ejiofor’s character’s owner, noted that Europe had worked out many of the issues America still grapples with. “America is such a young country and with that it has all the promise and hope and the land of opportunity and people can really start at the bottom and make whatever they want out of their lives if they put the energy in and luck and anything else alongside it,” he said. “I think it’s an extraordinary place. But you know, I guess we just have a longer history of beating each other up in Europe and wars and whatnot.” (He noted that, in Europe, people of Romani descent “get the rough end of the stick.”)

“The issues America still grapples with” is, you know, race, history of racism, equality and so on.  Ok, this irks…

View original post 157 more words